IMPORTANT NOTE: This recipe from washed flour should be interpreted as a general guide. If you've never washed flour, I highly recommend that you experiment with the technique first, especially before trying to create a holiday meal for the first time. The success you have with this will also depend on the protein content of your flour. To make this, I used bread flour with 12.7% protein. If using something lower, you may wind up with less yield and that can affect your measurements, especially with the amount of tofu you use. I do not suggest using anything lower than 11% protein for this.

Yields4 ServingsRating
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What could be easier than throwing everything into your slow cooker? I love to simmer like this for the best shreds, and it works awesome for cutlets or a roast, too. You can always add more seasoning to the dough, (especially if roasting) but this amount leaves the seitan "open" to be used as you would chicken in lots of dishes. Hang on to that broth cause it makes an amazing soup base or gravy!


Ingredients

Broth
 2 qts wateror more if needed to cover
 2 large onions, roughly chopped
 2 large carrots, roughly chopped
 3 cloves garlic, smashed or chopped
 6 sprigs parsely
 2 bay leaves
 1 tsp whole peppercorns
 3 tbsp nutritional yeast
 3 tsp salt or more to taste
 1 tsp dry sage
 4 sprigs fresh thymeor 2 tsp dry
 1 sprig rosemaryor 1 tsp dry
Chicken
 8 cups flour**NOTE: I used bread flour with 12.7% protein. I would not recommend using flour with less than 11% protein for this, or your gluten yield will be much smaller.
 3 ½ cups waterstart with 3 and add a little more as needed
 2 tbsp chickenless bouillon I always have this stored in a jar in my fridge, but you can sub your favorite powder
Skin for roasting* (optional)
 1 pc Vietnamese rice paper wrapper (round)
 ½ cup reserved vegetable broth
 2 tbsp non-dairy butter
Basting liquid for roasting* (optional)
 3 tbsp non-dairy butter
 1 tbsp soy sauce or coconut aminos
 ¼ cup reserved broth
 ¼ tsp poultry seasoning

Directions

1

Prepare your dough ball for washing. New to washing flour? Check out the video or follow steps 1-7 here. For the most shreddy results, you want to wash the flour pretty thoroughly, to the cloudy/hazy stage.

2

While your dough ball is resting in water, prepare your simmering liquid. I add everything into my slow cooker and get it heating up. A 6 qt Instant Pot on the slow cooker "normal" setting works great, too.

IMPORTANT: My broth stayed at a steady temperature of about 190F (85C). If cooking on the stove make sure it stays below a simmer after adding in the seitan. You want it to be barely bubbling or you could wind up with spongey results.

3

Once your gluten has drained for at least 20 minutes after washing, add it to a blender (working in batches if necessary) with 2T of chickun bouillon. Blend until those ingredients are evenly incorporated.

4

After processing, let your gluten rest about another hour on the counter or until the strands have developed enough so you can stretch it without breaking. You'll want to be able to stretch it enough to tie in a couple big knots for roasting, or even more for shreds, twisting the dough as you knot.

If you're making cutlets, divide the dough into 4-6 pieces first (depending on the size you want) and knot them individually. I then press them out into more "cutlet" shapes and let them rest for another 10 minutes so they flatten out a little bit.

5

Add your dough to the preheated broth and let it slowly cook for about 1 1/2-2 hours (about 30-40 minutes for cutlets). No need to flip it if it's covered in liquid.

TIP: Some people have said their dough take longer to cook than 2 hours. It should feel a little tough/stiff and have the ability to stay together. Mine typically floats when it's done, but others have reported theirs did not. This may be because it can stick a little to the bottom.

6

When it's done, let it come to room temperature and then strain the broth. If shredding, you can do this while it's still warm. I like to put the seitan back into the strained broth and let it rest in the fridge like this overnight. The next day pull it out of the broth to let it dry a bit, and finish by using in a stir fry, curry, marinate for the grill, or any way you would normally use chicken.

7

IF ROASTING: Preheat the oven to 325F. Pull the seitan out of the broth so it comes to room temperature and has a chance to drain.

You can add the optional basting ingredients to a small pot on the stove and bring to a simmer, then lower the temp so it stays warm. Add the optional rice paper skin, if using. Coat the bottom of a roasting pan with about 3/4-1c of the simmering broth.

Cover and cook to heat through for about 45 minutes, basting about every 15. For the final 15 minutes, leave it uncovered. For a darker, crispier skin, baste one final time and set your oven to broil for a few minutes.


Nutrition Facts

Servings 4

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Vegan Deli-Style Beef | Washed Flour SeitanBy JenIf you're looking for a flavorful, yet simple recipe for beef from washed flour, look no further! No need to worry about achieving the perfect oven temperature, frying or making a broth, because this seitan is cooked by wrapping and steaming. It slices up perfectly for sandwiches, or you can make thicker cutlets and fry them up for a quick steak-style seitan, too!
Vegan Deli-Style Ham | Washed Flour SeitanBy JenIf you're looking for a flavorful, yet simple recipe for ham from washed flour, look no further! No need to worry about achieving the perfect oven temperature, frying or making a broth, because this seitan is cooked by wrapping and steaming. Slices up perfectly for sandwiches, too!
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1 2 3 4

Ingredients

Broth
 2 qts wateror more if needed to cover
 2 large onions, roughly chopped
 2 large carrots, roughly chopped
 3 cloves garlic, smashed or chopped
 6 sprigs parsely
 2 bay leaves
 1 tsp whole peppercorns
 3 tbsp nutritional yeast
 3 tsp salt or more to taste
 1 tsp dry sage
 4 sprigs fresh thymeor 2 tsp dry
 1 sprig rosemaryor 1 tsp dry
Chicken
 8 cups flour**NOTE: I used bread flour with 12.7% protein. I would not recommend using flour with less than 11% protein for this, or your gluten yield will be much smaller.
 3 ½ cups waterstart with 3 and add a little more as needed
 2 tbsp chickenless bouillon I always have this stored in a jar in my fridge, but you can sub your favorite powder
Skin for roasting* (optional)
 1 pc Vietnamese rice paper wrapper (round)
 ½ cup reserved vegetable broth
 2 tbsp non-dairy butter
Basting liquid for roasting* (optional)
 3 tbsp non-dairy butter
 1 tbsp soy sauce or coconut aminos
 ¼ cup reserved broth
 ¼ tsp poultry seasoning

Directions

1

Prepare your dough ball for washing. New to washing flour? Check out the video or follow steps 1-7 here. For the most shreddy results, you want to wash the flour pretty thoroughly, to the cloudy/hazy stage.

2

While your dough ball is resting in water, prepare your simmering liquid. I add everything into my slow cooker and get it heating up. A 6 qt Instant Pot on the slow cooker "normal" setting works great, too.

IMPORTANT: My broth stayed at a steady temperature of about 190F (85C). If cooking on the stove make sure it stays below a simmer after adding in the seitan. You want it to be barely bubbling or you could wind up with spongey results.

3

Once your gluten has drained for at least 20 minutes after washing, add it to a blender (working in batches if necessary) with 2T of chickun bouillon. Blend until those ingredients are evenly incorporated.

4

After processing, let your gluten rest about another hour on the counter or until the strands have developed enough so you can stretch it without breaking. You'll want to be able to stretch it enough to tie in a couple big knots for roasting, or even more for shreds, twisting the dough as you knot.

If you're making cutlets, divide the dough into 4-6 pieces first (depending on the size you want) and knot them individually. I then press them out into more "cutlet" shapes and let them rest for another 10 minutes so they flatten out a little bit.

5

Add your dough to the preheated broth and let it slowly cook for about 1 1/2-2 hours (about 30-40 minutes for cutlets). No need to flip it if it's covered in liquid.

TIP: Some people have said their dough take longer to cook than 2 hours. It should feel a little tough/stiff and have the ability to stay together. Mine typically floats when it's done, but others have reported theirs did not. This may be because it can stick a little to the bottom.

6

When it's done, let it come to room temperature and then strain the broth. If shredding, you can do this while it's still warm. I like to put the seitan back into the strained broth and let it rest in the fridge like this overnight. The next day pull it out of the broth to let it dry a bit, and finish by using in a stir fry, curry, marinate for the grill, or any way you would normally use chicken.

7

IF ROASTING: Preheat the oven to 325F. Pull the seitan out of the broth so it comes to room temperature and has a chance to drain.

You can add the optional basting ingredients to a small pot on the stove and bring to a simmer, then lower the temp so it stays warm. Add the optional rice paper skin, if using. Coat the bottom of a roasting pan with about 3/4-1c of the simmering broth.

Cover and cook to heat through for about 45 minutes, basting about every 15. For the final 15 minutes, leave it uncovered. For a darker, crispier skin, baste one final time and set your oven to broil for a few minutes.

Washed Flour Chicken