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This peppery, garlicky, wine-infused vegan salami gets its fattiness and an extra boost of flavor from bits of provolone cheese. I'm calling it "Jen"oa-style. 🥴 🤣

I've been working to achieve a good vegan salami from washed flour for a while, and I'll admit this recipe is still a bit of a work in progress. I was happy enough with the results to write it out and I figured I'd publish it, cause it's pretty darn tasty as-is, but I plan to keep tweaking the seasonings. I'd also like to get it firmer with more of a "snap," so check back if you're ever looking for a variation.

Ingredients

 1 kg bread flour (approximately 7 1/4 cups)If using all purpose flour, add another 140g/1 cup
 690 ml water (3 cups)You may not need all of this, but if using AP flour you may need a little more.
Seasoning Paste
 4 garlic cloves, finely-minced
 ¼ cup vegan red wine
 2 tbsp vegan worcestershire sauceI use this recipe, but store-bought works, too.
 1 tbsp dijon mustard
 2 bay leaves
 1 tsp oregano
Dry Seasoning
 1 tbsp chili flakes
 1 tbsp beetroot
 1 tbsp smoked paprika
 ½ tbsp crushed black peppercornsI used a mortar/pestle
 1 tsp crushed fennel seedsI used a mortar/pestle
 2 tsp agar powder
 2 tsp salt
Fatty Bits
 100g/3.5oz your favorite provolone or gouda-style cheeseI used this recipe made from the leftover starch water.*
*If you're following this recipe for Vegan provolone to make the fatty bits, you can wash the flour and after it's done draining, store it in the fridge in a sealed container until your cheese is ready. I washed on day one and allowed the starch to settle overnight. I made the cheese on day two and let it firm up in the fridge overnight. Then I finished seasoning and steamed the seitan on day three.

If you don't want to make your own cheese, check out this Smoked Gouda from the Uncreamery, which was the original inspiration for this recipe!

Directions

1

Start by adding about 2 1/2 cups of water and mix it into your flour. If it's not forming into a dough, add a little more. It's easier to wash if it's a little bit sticky as opposed to dry and crumbly, but too much water can make it fall apart when washing. Make sure the water is fully incorporated. You can either knead it into a ball or simply let it rest in the bowl like this for 15 minutes. Then cover it with cool water and let it rest again for about an hour.

2

Wash that flour! If you're new to flour-washing, check out this step-by-step tutorial here. For this I washed to the cloudy/hazy water stage. I did not wash to perfectly clear water, but I washed thoroughly enough so that the texture would be chewy and the gluten strong enough to hold together around all the fatty bits.

3

Once washed, drain your ball of gluten for about 20-30 minutes. If making cheese from the leftover starch, you can store the drained gluten in the fridge until the cheese is ready.

Otherwise, while it's draining, add all of the seasoning paste ingredients to a small pot. Stir them together and bring the mixture up to a boil, then reduce heat to a low simmer. Continue to stir as the liquid reduces, taking care not to let it burn. It's ready once it's turned into a pasty consistency. Set it aside to cool.

4

Add chunks of the cheese to a food processor or chop by hand into small bits (pea-sized and smaller). Set them aside.

5

Wring out your gluten to remove as much excess water as possible. After doing this mine weighed approximately 475g, or just a little over a pound. Discard the bay leaves from the cooled seasoning paste and add it to a food processor along with the gluten and all of the dried seasonings. Blitz until it's fully mixed. If you don't have a processor, mix the paste and dry seasonings together, and use a knife or kitchen scissors to cut them into the gluten by hand.

6

Add the cheese into the processor with the gluten and pulse until it is fully mixed, or you can mix them together by hand. Shape the mound into a log and allow it to rest like this for about 30 minutes on a cutting board so can drain a little more if need be. This will give the gluten time to begin to form around the cheese.

7

For steaming you can use an Instant Pot fitted with the trivet or a pot on the stove with a vegetable steamer basket and lid. Add water until it sits just below the top of the trivet or basket, and if using the stove-top method get it going on medium/high.

8

Use aluminum foil or muslin/cheesecloth to wrap the seitan like a large sausage, twisting or tying the ends. You want it to be wrapped as tightly as possible so it doesn't have much room to expand. Place it in the Instant Pot and set to manual/high for one hour, or steam for one hour. When steaming, check it halfway through to make sure there's enough water in the pot.

9

The seitan should feel firm once cooked. Keeping it wrapped, let it come to room temperature. Then, let it rest in the fridge for about 8 hours or overnight. It will continue to firm up as it rests.


More Sausage & Porq Recipes

Vegan Pork Chops | Washed Flour SeitanBy JenThese vegan seitan pork chops are easy to make and incredibly versatile. The fatty layer really puts them over the top! Pan sear and then bake in a flavorful broth for the meatiest, juiciest chop ever!
Genoa Salami / Wash The Flour methodBy bigassveganThis salami is perfect... totally could end the sentence there, but I'll add that it's made for sandwiches, pizzas, and of course, vegan charcuterie boards of your dreams. Its look and texture are exactly like Genoa salami (what they use in Subway sandwiches btw) but I wanted to enrich it with a taste of red vine, fennel, and oregano, making it central Europe, German sausage-like, as that is what I had way more in my pre-vegan life.
Vegan Porq BrisketBy bigassveganSeitan on steroids? Vegans and omnivores alike can't believe this is seitan... but IT IS. And, like most homemade seitans, it is inexpensive and good for you (well, unless you are gluten intolerant 😣). Most of the ingredients you probably already have, and those you do not, I highly urge you to get, as they will up your seitan game, and you will use them onward and often, for sure! The visual of this Vegan Pork Brisket is everything and is for sure to be a show stopper on any mezze plate. It is unbelievable in various appetizers, puff pastries, in sandwiches, pasta dishes, etc.
Prosciutto deli slicesBy bigassveganSo happy with this Italian Prosciutto Crudo! It’s perfectly chewy, salty, with just a hint of sweetness, savory, very meaty... and perfectly captures that unsmoked, uncooked, dry-cured prosciutto taste we all know and love. The two different reds up it visually, and the washed flour “fatty” parts perfectly capture the chewier texture and elasticity of fat, giving it a different feel when eaten. It’s freakishly realistic and it may freak/gross out some people (It completely did me! 🙈). This recipe incorporates VWG and a little WTF. Both are very novice-friendly, and good ways to get into these two ways of seitan making, while also creating something amazing along the way. I highly recommend it!
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Ingredients

 1 kg bread flour (approximately 7 1/4 cups)If using all purpose flour, add another 140g/1 cup
 690 ml water (3 cups)You may not need all of this, but if using AP flour you may need a little more.
Seasoning Paste
 4 garlic cloves, finely-minced
 ¼ cup vegan red wine
 2 tbsp vegan worcestershire sauceI use this recipe, but store-bought works, too.
 1 tbsp dijon mustard
 2 bay leaves
 1 tsp oregano
Dry Seasoning
 1 tbsp chili flakes
 1 tbsp beetroot
 1 tbsp smoked paprika
 ½ tbsp crushed black peppercornsI used a mortar/pestle
 1 tsp crushed fennel seedsI used a mortar/pestle
 2 tsp agar powder
 2 tsp salt
Fatty Bits
 100g/3.5oz your favorite provolone or gouda-style cheeseI used this recipe made from the leftover starch water.*

Directions

1

Start by adding about 2 1/2 cups of water and mix it into your flour. If it's not forming into a dough, add a little more. It's easier to wash if it's a little bit sticky as opposed to dry and crumbly, but too much water can make it fall apart when washing. Make sure the water is fully incorporated. You can either knead it into a ball or simply let it rest in the bowl like this for 15 minutes. Then cover it with cool water and let it rest again for about an hour.

2

Wash that flour! If you're new to flour-washing, check out this step-by-step tutorial here. For this I washed to the cloudy/hazy water stage. I did not wash to perfectly clear water, but I washed thoroughly enough so that the texture would be chewy and the gluten strong enough to hold together around all the fatty bits.

3

Once washed, drain your ball of gluten for about 20-30 minutes. If making cheese from the leftover starch, you can store the drained gluten in the fridge until the cheese is ready.

Otherwise, while it's draining, add all of the seasoning paste ingredients to a small pot. Stir them together and bring the mixture up to a boil, then reduce heat to a low simmer. Continue to stir as the liquid reduces, taking care not to let it burn. It's ready once it's turned into a pasty consistency. Set it aside to cool.

4

Add chunks of the cheese to a food processor or chop by hand into small bits (pea-sized and smaller). Set them aside.

5

Wring out your gluten to remove as much excess water as possible. After doing this mine weighed approximately 475g, or just a little over a pound. Discard the bay leaves from the cooled seasoning paste and add it to a food processor along with the gluten and all of the dried seasonings. Blitz until it's fully mixed. If you don't have a processor, mix the paste and dry seasonings together, and use a knife or kitchen scissors to cut them into the gluten by hand.

6

Add the cheese into the processor with the gluten and pulse until it is fully mixed, or you can mix them together by hand. Shape the mound into a log and allow it to rest like this for about 30 minutes on a cutting board so can drain a little more if need be. This will give the gluten time to begin to form around the cheese.

7

For steaming you can use an Instant Pot fitted with the trivet or a pot on the stove with a vegetable steamer basket and lid. Add water until it sits just below the top of the trivet or basket, and if using the stove-top method get it going on medium/high.

8

Use aluminum foil or muslin/cheesecloth to wrap the seitan like a large sausage, twisting or tying the ends. You want it to be wrapped as tightly as possible so it doesn't have much room to expand. Place it in the Instant Pot and set to manual/high for one hour, or steam for one hour. When steaming, check it halfway through to make sure there's enough water in the pot.

9

The seitan should feel firm once cooked. Keeping it wrapped, let it come to room temperature. Then, let it rest in the fridge for about 8 hours or overnight. It will continue to firm up as it rests.

Vegan Salami | Washed Flour Seitan