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This vegan bacon is made from the starch water that remains from washing flour to make seitan. It's super simple to make, and despite my love for bacon made from vital wheat gluten, this the closest to the real thing as I've ever come.



Ingredients

Meaty Part (Red Streaks)
 1 ¼ cups starch water, mixedsee instructions below
 2 tbsp soy sauce or liquid aminos
 1 tbsp maple syrup
 2 tsp beet root powder and/or a few drops of red vegan food coloringfor color
 1 ½ tsp smoked paprika
 1 tsp dried porcini or shiitaki mushroom powder
 ¾ tsp salt
 ½ tsp torula yeastor sub 1tsp nutritional yeast with an extra couple drops of liquid smoke
 ½ tsp garlic powder
 ½ tsp onion powder
 ½ tsp liquid smoke
 ½ tsp marmite
Fatty Part (White Streaks)
 ¾ cup starch water, mixedsee instructions below
 ½ tsp onion powder
 ½ tsp garlic powder
 ½ tsp white pepper
 ½ tsp salt
Plus Oil for Frying

Directions

1

PREPARE YOUR STARCH WATER
After washing flour, let your starch water rest for several hours or overnight so it has time to settle. Check out the step-by-step for washing flour to make seitan here. Once settled, pour off most of the excess water, leaving about 15% on top. Then stir them together. This does not need to be an exact science, but you're looking for the mixture to resemble a very thin crepe batter when its all stirred up.

TIP: You can leave your starch water in the fridge for several days if you're not going to be able to use it right away.

2

MIX YOUR BATTER
Separate the batter (mixed starch water) into 2 parts. Measure out 1 1/4 cups for the "meat," and 3/4 cup for the "fat." Then add all of the "meat" ingredients into the 1 1/4 cup batter, and the "fat" ingredients into the 3/4 cup batter. I used a blender stick to make it super quick, but you can use a whisk, blender, or even a spoon.

TIP: The measurements do not need to be exact. I worked with what I had from one washing and you may have more or less. You can adjust the seasonings to however you like and think of this more as a general guide.

3

MAKE YOUR "PANCAKES"
Heat a large, non-stick pan over medium heat. Add a little bit of cooking spray or oil to keep the batter from sticking. Pour thin stripes of red and white mixture (using more red than white) into the hot pan, and move the pan as necessary to keep the batter as thin as possible, spreading it around the pan into a solid "pancake". If it's too thick your bacon will be more chewy than crispy. As a solid sheet, it should be able to easily slide around the pan. No need to flip, it will cook through fairly quickly if it's thin enough. Just transfer it to a plate and keep making pancakes until your batter is used up.

TIP: My measuring cups have spouts so I kept everything in them as I mixed to make the batter easy to pour out later. I've heard some people transfer their batter to used squeeze bottles to make it even easier to keep the batter strips as thin as possible.

4

CUT YOUR PANCAKES INTO STRIPS OF BACON
Once you have your pancakes made, you can use a pizza cutter or kitchen scissors to cut, or rip them into strips. I did a combination of cutting and ripping for a more authentic look.

TIP: Don't worry if your pancakes rip some as cooking, they will look more authentic with torn edges. Any little pieces can be made into bacon bits.

5

FRY YOUR BACON
Heat another tablespoon or two of oil on the pan over medium-high heat, and working in batches, fry your strips, adding oil as necessary to finish.


More Porq & Starch Water Recipes

Genoa Salami / Wash The Flour methodBy bigassveganThis salami is perfect... totally could end the sentence there, but I'll add that it's made for sandwiches, pizzas, and of course, vegan charcuterie boards of your dreams. Its look and texture are exactly like Genoa salami (what they use in Subway sandwiches btw) but I wanted to enrich it with a taste of red vine, fennel, and oregano, making it central Europe, German sausage-like, as that is what I had way more in my pre-vegan life.
Vegan Porq BrisketBy bigassveganSeitan on steroids? Vegans and omnivores alike can't believe this is seitan... but IT IS. And, like most homemade seitans, it is inexpensive and good for you (well, unless you are gluten intolerant 😣). Most of the ingredients you probably already have, and those you do not, I highly urge you to get, as they will up your seitan game, and you will use them onward and often, for sure! The visual of this Vegan Pork Brisket is everything and is for sure to be a show stopper on any mezze plate. It is unbelievable in various appetizers, puff pastries, in sandwiches, pasta dishes, etc.
Prosciutto deli slicesBy bigassveganSo happy with this Italian Prosciutto Crudo! It’s perfectly chewy, salty, with just a hint of sweetness, savory, very meaty... and perfectly captures that unsmoked, uncooked, dry-cured prosciutto taste we all know and love. The two different reds up it visually, and the washed flour “fatty” parts perfectly capture the chewier texture and elasticity of fat, giving it a different feel when eaten. It’s freakishly realistic and it may freak/gross out some people (It completely did me! 🙈). This recipe incorporates VWG and a little WTF. Both are very novice-friendly, and good ways to get into these two ways of seitan making, while also creating something amazing along the way. I highly recommend it!
Serbian Pork SausageBy bigassveganThis is a typical Serbian homemade sausage aka domaća kobasica. It resembles pepperoni a bit, but is milder, has more onions and isn’t as oily. It’s similar to Polish kielbasa, Slovenian kobasa, Turkish soujouk, and Greek loukaniko. It’s nothing like Italian sausages. It’s dry and firm, and meant to go on a grill or be pan-fried, not eaten raw. This way, they soften a bit on the inside and crisp up on the outside. In Serbia, the sausages are most often paired with fried eggs (recipe also included in the notes!), egg scrambles with feta, with baked beans, and they are a must during any decent grilling event. Southern parts of the country make them spicier, and northern milder. This recipe is right down the middle.
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Ingredients

Meaty Part (Red Streaks)
 1 ¼ cups starch water, mixedsee instructions below
 2 tbsp soy sauce or liquid aminos
 1 tbsp maple syrup
 2 tsp beet root powder and/or a few drops of red vegan food coloringfor color
 1 ½ tsp smoked paprika
 1 tsp dried porcini or shiitaki mushroom powder
 ¾ tsp salt
 ½ tsp torula yeastor sub 1tsp nutritional yeast with an extra couple drops of liquid smoke
 ½ tsp garlic powder
 ½ tsp onion powder
 ½ tsp liquid smoke
 ½ tsp marmite
Fatty Part (White Streaks)
 ¾ cup starch water, mixedsee instructions below
 ½ tsp onion powder
 ½ tsp garlic powder
 ½ tsp white pepper
 ½ tsp salt
Plus Oil for Frying

Directions

1

PREPARE YOUR STARCH WATER
After washing flour, let your starch water rest for several hours or overnight so it has time to settle. Check out the step-by-step for washing flour to make seitan here. Once settled, pour off most of the excess water, leaving about 15% on top. Then stir them together. This does not need to be an exact science, but you're looking for the mixture to resemble a very thin crepe batter when its all stirred up.

TIP: You can leave your starch water in the fridge for several days if you're not going to be able to use it right away.

2

MIX YOUR BATTER
Separate the batter (mixed starch water) into 2 parts. Measure out 1 1/4 cups for the "meat," and 3/4 cup for the "fat." Then add all of the "meat" ingredients into the 1 1/4 cup batter, and the "fat" ingredients into the 3/4 cup batter. I used a blender stick to make it super quick, but you can use a whisk, blender, or even a spoon.

TIP: The measurements do not need to be exact. I worked with what I had from one washing and you may have more or less. You can adjust the seasonings to however you like and think of this more as a general guide.

3

MAKE YOUR "PANCAKES"
Heat a large, non-stick pan over medium heat. Add a little bit of cooking spray or oil to keep the batter from sticking. Pour thin stripes of red and white mixture (using more red than white) into the hot pan, and move the pan as necessary to keep the batter as thin as possible, spreading it around the pan into a solid "pancake". If it's too thick your bacon will be more chewy than crispy. As a solid sheet, it should be able to easily slide around the pan. No need to flip, it will cook through fairly quickly if it's thin enough. Just transfer it to a plate and keep making pancakes until your batter is used up.

TIP: My measuring cups have spouts so I kept everything in them as I mixed to make the batter easy to pour out later. I've heard some people transfer their batter to used squeeze bottles to make it even easier to keep the batter strips as thin as possible.

4

CUT YOUR PANCAKES INTO STRIPS OF BACON
Once you have your pancakes made, you can use a pizza cutter or kitchen scissors to cut, or rip them into strips. I did a combination of cutting and ripping for a more authentic look.

TIP: Don't worry if your pancakes rip some as cooking, they will look more authentic with torn edges. Any little pieces can be made into bacon bits.

5

FRY YOUR BACON
Heat another tablespoon or two of oil on the pan over medium-high heat, and working in batches, fry your strips, adding oil as necessary to finish.

Starch Water Bacon